Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Cost of Shipping for Restaurant Furniture?

FAQ's From the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

We live in a world where we’ve become accustomed to free or cheap shipping: free two-day shipping on that new laptop that you bought from Amazon Prime, or a flat $5.99 shipping on that silver charm bracelet that you got your wife for mother’s day. Those items ship via small package carriers like the US Postal Service, UPS Ground, or FedEx. They’re limited in size, weighing only a couple of pounds on average, and arrive at your front door in days.

Not all goods are as easy, or as cheap, to ship, however. Take restaurant furniture, for example. It’s big, bulky, heavy, and often ordered in multiple pieces (think 40 chairs, 10 bar stools, and 10 tables). For that reason, furniture is put on pallets and ships via a different method called less-than-truckload (LTL) carrier. LTL carriers take large palletized freight, and deliver it to your business on large semi-trucks.

There are many factors that determine the cost of shipping restaurant furniture via LTL carrier, some are obvious, and others, while not immediately apparent, make sense when you think about them. Here is a short list of the most important variables in the shipping calculation, along with a brief explanation.

Distance Between Shipper & Customer

The distance between the shipper and the customer (receiver) is one of the more obvious factors in the cost of shipping; we naturally expect that shipping from Boston to California will be more expensive than, say, shipping from Pennsylvania to Ohio. More distance means higher fuel costs and more driver time (wages). In addition, long trips often require a team of drivers that can alternate driving time in order to get the shipment to its destination in a timely manner.

Location

Shippers have what are called “good lanes” and “bad lanes”. A good lane is one that sees a lot of daily freight traffic, so the carrier knows that if they send a truck to that location, the odds are good that they will be able to fill the truck on the return trip. A bad lane is one in which there isn’t a lot of freight coming out, which means that the carrier may have to return empty, or only partially full. If a carrier can’t fill the truck, then they are making less money, or even losing money, on that trip. If a lane is bad for a carrier, then they will often charge more per piece to compensate themselves for the fact that they may not be able to fill the truck on the return. One prime example of a “bad lane” is Florida. There is a lot of freight going in to Florida, but not much coming out (for various reasons), so carriers will often charge a premium to deliver there.

Destination Type (Residential, Commercial, or Limited Access)

Customers often ask why it costs more to send a shipment to their home than it does to send the same shipment to their business. There are actually many reasons, but we’ll just list a few. First, businesses tend to be located in areas where large trucks can easily get in and out (if not, then they’re called limited access locations and are subject to the same fees as residential locations). Residential streets, on the other hand, are often too narrow for large semis to maneuver, so carriers have to send in a smaller truck, which means more handling of your freight. Second, businesses generally have somebody (or multiple people) and equipment on hand during business hours to unload the truck quickly and efficiently. Carriers know that they can just show up, open their doors, and the employees of the business will take care of the rest. With residential delivery, carriers have to call ahead to coordinate delivery, work around the homeowner’s schedule, and wait there until they unload the truck – often by hand.

Size of the Shipment

To simplify this point, let’s say you’re an LTL carrier that delivers from New York City to Orlando, FL. You know that to cover your costs and make a profit, you need to charge $3000 per truck for the trip. Now, a customer comes along and wants to ship 100 barstools to Orlando, which will take up about ⅓ of the truck. How much do you need to charge them? Of course, $1000! Now this is an over-simplification of the complex algorithms that carriers use to determine freight rates, but it does illustrate the point that the more of the truck you take up with your shipment, the more you pay.

Weight of the Shipment

You might be tempted to think that weight is the biggest factor in determining your freight costs, but that would be wrong. Weight does play a role, but it’s a smaller role than other variables. For example, according to one freight carrier website, you can ship a 48” x 48” x 60” pallet that weighs 200 pounds from Mercer, PA to Beverly Hills, CA (thank you Beverly Hills 90210 for being perpetually stuck in my brain and giving me a test zip code for life) for around $300. If we double the weight to 400 pounds, the rate only goes up around $50. Triple the weight, and you only increase another $20. How is this possible? Freight shippers use something called freight class, which is based on the density of your shipment: large, light materials have a high freight class, while smaller, denser materials have a lower freight class. As we raise the weight of the shipment, our density calculations go up, and our freight class goes down, which means that our overall rate only goes up a little bit for each additional pound that we ship.

Additional Services (Accessorials)

Accessorials are small additional services carriers provide that add up in a big way. Need a phone call before delivery? That’ll be up to $25, please. Want a lift gate to lower your pallets to the ground? They can range between $50 up to $200 depending on the carrier. Want the driver to bring your freight into the building? Don’t even ask! The point is that accessorial charges can be expensive, and should be avoided when possible.

As you’ve probably noticed, LTL freight is different from small package shipping in many ways. It can sound expensive at first, but there are two important things to remember.

  1. If you put 20 chairs on a pallet and it costs $200 to ship them, then that is only $10 per chair. If you were to ship the same number of chairs individually via small package delivery, the cost would be much higher.
  2. Truly free shipping is pretty much non-existent. You are almost always paying the freight, even if it doesn’t seem like it. It might come in the form of higher prices or reduced service levels, but shipping is always part of the cost of ordering restaurant furniture.

We hope this guide shed some light on the often confusing world of LTL freight and the true cost of shipping restaurant furniture.

If you have any additional questions, our shipping department is always happy to help. Just give us a call 800-986-5352.


Can I Use a Solid Wood Table Top as a Bar/Counter Top?

FAQ from East Coast Chair and Barstool

There’s no doubt that our wood tabletops are eye-catching. So much so, in fact, that many customers want to know if they can use them to top their bars or counter tops. Unfortunately, the answer is no, and there’s a good reason.

At East Coast Chair & Barstool, we offer a plethora of solid wood table tops that are manufactured with a specific sealing process designed for commercial dining tables, not bar tops.  Bar tops are traditionally finished with a thick layer of epoxy to create an impenetrable barrier between liquids and the surface of the wood. While this works well for bars, it tends to take away from the character and overall look of the wood, which is why it is not used for tables.

Even with our premium grade finishes, our solid wood tables are not warrantied for the wear and tear like an official bar top.

If you have further questions about our solid wood table tops, please give our customer care specialists a call at 800-986-5352.

What Bucket Bar Stool is Best for My Restaurant?

FAQ from East Coast Chair and Barstool

When you envision a classic bar in your head, you most likely imagine a bucket bar stool at the bar top. Buckets are comfortable and encourage customers to stay longer and spend more. But how are you going to know which one is best for your bar or restaurant?

To answer this question, you should first ask yourself what your goals are for your bar. Is comfort your top priority? Are looks important to you? Are you looking to fit as many as possible or are you okay with fewer stools? These questions are the best indicator of what bar stool you should go with.

Comfort

Any bucket bar stool is going to offer a higher level of comfort than a standard wood or metal stool, but if comfort is your top priority there are a few things to look for. First is seat thickness; you want a stool with a thick cushion because more cushion equals more comfort. Another is a flex back construction. Nobody wants to sit This allows for customers to lean back or adjust for maximum comfort. Finally, the molding of the seat. With an ergonomic seat and back, the seat will mold to the customer’s body for the ultimate in bar stool comfort.

Comfortable bar stools work well in restaurants that want to encourage customers to stay for a while and continue to drink.

Aesthetic

If you want your bucket bar stools to really add to your aesthetic, you might want to consider a tufted bucket bar stool. The unique buttoned vinyl design is not something that you see everywhere and will have your customers doing a double take.

Another option would be a bar stool with a decorative stitch. It may not seem like a lot, but the simple stitch addition will make the bucket stand out from the standard bucket bar stool.

Tufted or stitched bucket bar stools are a great option for bars looking to create a certain vibe or even a luxurious atmosphere.

Spacing

If you are a little short on space, a bar stool that has a rounding to the back often has a smaller footprint, which allows for more to be comfortably placed at a bar. This setup works well for smaller venues that still want to offer comfortable buckets to their customers.

Budget

Just because a bucket has a lower price point, doesn’t mean it isn’t a good stool. There are a few things you can look for in a budget-friendly stool to make sure it will work for you. A waterfall edge is a good option to have, this simply means there is no seam on the front of the seat, so it won’t tear with the consistent sliding on and off that some customers do.

Another feature to look for is seams with cord or PVC edging to protect them. This will help to increase the lifespan of your bucket.

Budget-friendly buckets are a great option for VFW’s, Elk Clubs, and similar organizations because they are cost-friendly and can keep customers comfortable for extended sitting and buying.

 

Still not sure what bucket bar stool would work for your business? Contact our customer care team at 800-986-5352 for their expert advice.

What is a Tufted Booth?

 

What is a Freight Forwarder

When looking at restaurant booths, there are a lot of options to choose from. If you decide to create a custom booth design the options can seem endless and overwhelming. One of the options that you might notice is the selection for a tufted booth, but what exactly is a tufted booth?

To tuft a fabric means to make depressions at regular intervals by passing thread through it. Most commonly found on different types of cushions, including the back cushion of a restaurant booth.

A tufted booth is a fabric or vinyl restaurant booth that has tufting on the back created by depressions in the material. Typically, it is done in a repeating diamond pattern, which is most common. The diamond button pattern uses a combination of buttons and folds to create diamond shapes on the back of the booth.

In total there are four types of tufting: biscuit button tufting, diamond button tufting, single line button tufting, and buttonless tufting. By using these four different styles, completely different looks can be created.

Adding tufting to a restaurant booth can create some flair and visual interest, to an otherwise simplistic booth. Or it can be used as added texture to an already beautiful booth. Designers use tufting to create a particular booth design that can then help communicate to customers the feel of the restaurant. Typically, it is used to communicate a feeling of comfort and luxury.

If you’d like to see examples of all styles of booths, check out our booth gallery on our Facebook page.

 

What is Flex Back Seating?

When looking at restaurant seating there are a lot of different things to look for. A phrase you might see appearing quite often during your search is the term ‘flex back’. But what exactly is a flex back? A flex back chair or bar stool has a back that tilts as the person seated moves or applies pressure on the back.

So, now you might be asking yourself “what is the benefit of a flex back?” They add comfort to the chair by allowing your customers to lean back and get comfy, instead of hitting the unmoving pieces of a standard back.

The piece that allows the back to flex is usually a metal piece that securely connects the seat to the back. It is secure enough to ensure the furniture retains its structural integrity, but also allow for some movement.

Studies have shown when customers feel comfortable they stay longer; when they stay longer, they spend more. Restaurants with a more formal atmosphere, that want to encourage diners to stay and continue ordering, tend to opt for comfortable furniture with features like flex backs. This is often seen in bucket bar stools where the intent is to keep customers at the bar.

Standard and flex back options are both structurally sound and hold similar capacities. Ultimately, a flex back allows for additional comfort for your customers and increased spending potential at your restaurant.

What is Communal Dining?

Over the past few years, you may have noticed an increase in large dining tables in restaurants. In the past tables of this size were usually relegated to the family dining room, but now these communal tables are popping up in restaurants all over the country.

These tables are used to facilitate communal dining, which is the practice of dining with others, usually accommodating more than one party. While they might be reminiscent of cafeterias and beer halls, they have gotten a facelift in recent years. With both indoor and outdoor options designed to work with current trends, these tables help to complete the look of a restaurant, instead of just being a way to save space.

The concept is centered on food and people coming together to share a meal. The sharing of a table helps to break down the barriers of the restaurant and promotes conversation flow among patrons.

Most restaurants never dreamed their patrons would tolerate dining with strangers, but it makes good business sense. The large tables allow restaurants to accommodate large groups more easily. Even when the table is split into several parties, it adds seats, creating a good use of space.

Many cities with a large “foodie” market have seen great success with communal dining tables. Cities like Boston, Chicago, and New York see small groups come in, sit down, and interact with each other. Then they end up discussing the food and end up buying each other drinks and making new friends.

If you have the right space, and think it will work with your concept, there are many options to choose from to fit your look. It is recommended that the tables be large enough to seat from 8 to 12 guests and be at least 30 inches wide to ensure that everyone has enough space for food and electronic devices.

Do you think a communal dining experience would enhance your restaurant? Let us know in the comments below!

Can You Use Wood Tables Outside?

FAQ's From the Files of East Coast Chair & BarstoolThe simple answer here? No, you should not use hardwood table tops outside your restaurant. Hardwood tables can include any sort of oak, maple, beech, cherry, walnut, or untreated pine woods.

Wood table tops are commonly used in restaurants because of their durability, strength, and the character they bring to your overall design. But to keep them that way, there are some rules you need to follow.

Climate control is crucial for the longevity of wood tables. Wood table tops should be in rooms that are 68°-72° with 40-45% humidity. This is extremely important, even when it comes to adjusting the thermostat (which should be done gradually). Wood tables will crack or warp in rooms where temperatures vary. Abrupt temperature changes, dryness, and humidity can all lead to the wood expanding or contracting, while losing structural integrity.

You should also avoid putting wood tables in direct sunlight, next to heat sources (like radiators or ovens), and under bright lighting. Even wood tops in storage should be in a climate-controlled area to retain their original state. Many customers try to put these hardwood tables under a covering, but the real issue isn’t just the weather; it’s the humidity levels. Climate control is crucial when keeping wood tops in their best condition, making it impossible to use them outside because you can’t control the humidity.

Another reason why you might not want to use wood tables on your outdoor patio is that you’re likely breaking your warranty for that table top. Before you ever put any furniture in your outdoor space, you’ll want to be sure that furniture item is warrantied for outdoor use. This is the best way to protect the investment you’ve just spent to furnish your restaurant.

If the wood look is a must for your restaurant or bar, consider wood look-alike. There are many textured poly lumber options out there that have the look and feel of a wood texture, but don’t require the rigorous maintenance.

Textured Wood Grain Finish Options

How Do I Maintain my Outdoor Restaurant Furniture?

FAQ's From the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

The sun is starting to shine, more and more of your customers want to eat outdoors. Before you say yes, you need to take a moment to consider the condition of your outdoor furniture. After an off-season spent in storage, there is a good chance they are going to need a little bit of maintenance.

Materials such as aluminum, poly lumber, and teak are commonly used outside because of their durability in outdoor conditions.  By taking a look at each of these materials, and more, we will examine the best ways to maintain and clean your outdoor furniture to not only keep it looking its best but to make sure it lasts for years to come.

Hardware:

Every year before placing your furniture outdoors, you should tighten any loose screws and double check for any missing hardware. As the season continues, be sure to check them intermittently and tighten as needed.

Glides:

This is also a great time to check glides. Replace any that are missing or broken to help protect your flooring and keep your furniture level.

Umbrellas: Umbrellas are a great way to make your outdoor areas more appealing to customers. To keep them looking their best, regularly wipe off loose dirt to avoid it becoming embedded into the fabric. For larger spots, clean with a soft bristle brush, soap and cold water as soon as possible to prevent staining.

Most umbrella poles can be easily wiped down with soap and water. If your umbrella pole has metal joints, then using a spray lubricant will help to increase the life of the pole. For a wooden pole, a paste wax applied with a soft cloth, will restore its shine and create a finish to help protect against scratches.

Wrought Iron/Cast Iron: As with all furniture items, it is good to regularly check for dirt. This can be sprayed off with a garden hose, but it is important to dry it completely with a towel to avoid future rust. To help extend the life of your wrought iron furniture, applying an automotive spray wax once a year can help to create an extra barrier against rust.

If rust does occur, sandpaper can be used to lightly sand the rust and then touchup paint can be used for coverage.

Poly Lumber: For light dirt, some soap and water should do the trick for poly lumber. For more persistent stains, you can use a power washer. If you don’t have easy access to a power washer, a magic eraser also works very well.

One of the biggest benefits of poly lumber is just how easy it is to maintain. Simply check to make sure that no screws have worked themselves loose and you should be good to go.

Aluminum/Stainless Steel: When pulling out your aluminum furniture for the season make sure you check all of the welds. It is important to check these pressure points to ensure safety. While looking at the welds you can look for any nicks or scratches on the coating. If you find some, they can be touched up with a damp cloth and a nonabrasive product, such as Soft Scrub.

Much of the aluminum/stainless steel items on the market today are powder coated and rust proof but be sure to check with the manufacturer before you make assumptions. If the furniture isn’t, you can use a paste wax to help protect the surfaces. When the furniture is in need of a good cleaning, some mild soap and water should do the trick.

Teak: Teak can be a bit of a temperamental wood when it comes to cleaning. To clean it and maintain the color, mix a solution of one cup of vinegar with one gallon of warm water. Apply the cleaning mixture to the teak using a soft plastic brush and gently scrub into the wood. Allow the mixture to sit for about 15 minutes. Rinse thoroughly with clean water.

All teak furniture needs to be oiled once a year to prevent it from losing that beautiful teak color. If you see some water marks appear, they can be sanded with a light sandpaper.

IsoTop and Werzalit Table Tops: A big draw of these table tops is that they can be used both indoors and out. When used outdoors, these table tops are super easy to clean and can be hosed down on your patio using soap and water.

While cleaning, take some time to confirm that your table tops and bases are firmly connected. Flipping the table over and viewing it from underneath is a great way to check the screws and clean any of those hard to reach spots.

Finally, if you don’t use your outdoor furniture year-round it is best to store it over the winter months; it will increase the lifespan of your furniture exponentially.

What is a Patio Umbrella?

FAQ's From the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

When you own a business, restaurant, or hotel, purchasing strong outdoor furniture is key. Buying well-made restaurant furniture can save you from buying replacements after every outdoor season. And buying a patio umbrella is no different.

A patio umbrella is an umbrella made to be used heavily in commercial environments with higher grade materials. These umbrellas are made to be more durable and resilient to wind, rain, sun damage, or salt spray.

A big difference between commercial patio umbrellas and their residential counterparts is the materials that are used. If you analyze what an umbrella is made of, you’ll have a better understanding if it will give you peace of mind (or not) as a part of your business’s patio.

To give your customers a shaded space on your patio year after year, buying lasting umbrellas for your patio is an important investment. This is not a scenario where it’s safe to grab the first umbrella you see at your hardware store. We’ve put together criteria to remember when it comes to purchasing commercial-grade patio umbrellas. How does your umbrella stack up?

Patio Umbrellas in Sidewalk Cafe

Sturdy frame- A patio umbrella frame should be made of wood, aluminum, or fiberglass. A traditional plastic is not going to have the same strength as these frames. Wood frames, commonly teak, are often chosen for their classic look but require the most care to retain their original integrity. Aluminum frames offer a lightweight structure that are low maintenance and affordable, which could be a good option for you if you’re buying a high volume. Fiberglass frames rely on strong glass fibers embedded in resin to create a pliable material that thrives in windy areas. Fiberglass frames can be pricier but can hold their worth in the long run when it comes to durability.

Canopy fabric quality- Think about it this way. The only thing between your customers and the sun’s rays is the umbrella’s canopy. The fabric quality of your patio umbrella’s canopy, like the frame, should be made with tougher materials for extended use. Canopies should be made from heavy gauge vinyl or marine-grade fabrics like Sunbrella, polyester, or olefin. Materials like these can help better prevent color fading and the breakdown of the fabric.

Strong foundation- The wrong base or stand for your patio umbrella can be a liability for your patio. Not only will your umbrella have trouble providing shade, but a weak base can send your umbrella flying. Take note of your patio umbrella’s recommended base weight to accurately choose your base’s material. Consider bases that are steel-plated or aluminum options that use a gravel filler to add weight.

The details- Be sure to inspect functional parts that help the umbrella tilt, move, and open. These parts need to be made from a hardy material like a powder coated steel to prevent rusting or breaking off, making it impossible to use the functions of the umbrella safely.

If you have any questions about choosing the right umbrella for your patio or pairing a base, please call our customer care team at 800-986-5352 for further assistance.

What is a patio umbrella?

What’s the Difference between Outdoor and Indoor Furniture?

FAQ's From the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

What makes a piece of furniture better suited for outdoor use versus indoor?

The easy answer is the material, but why does it matter from one material to another what goes outside? It’s all about how that material holds up against weather conditions and how often it is used.

Of course, you can technically place any outdoor chair inside your restaurant and it’s usable. But should you? The answer is no. Much of outdoor furniture is made from aluminum, a softer metal, that is not up to the heavy traffic of being inside a restaurant. Using an outdoor chair inside will lead to replacing your seating way sooner than you would like.

Outdoor furniture is made specifically to hold up to the weather. For example, aluminum is a popular choice for commercial outdoor furniture because it is rust-resistant. Untreated steel does not typically fare as well on patios and will rust when exposed to moisture. Another common example is wood furniture on a patio. It can be tempting to put a reclaimed table top outside, but it is sure to absorb moisture and warp, leaving you out of luck on your investment.

You should always pay attention to these warranties to get the most out of your product when you properly use it. Not adhering to a product’s intended use can void the warranty completely, making it very difficult for you to protect yourself as the buyer if something goes wrong.

Outdoor and Indoor Furniture

When you invest in restaurant furniture, you want it to be reliable and hold up for your customers. This requires action from you as a business owner to use the product for its intended use. By placing furniture where it doesn’t belong, you can damage the integrity of the furniture without realizing and cause injury to your customers. Protect yourself and your customers by knowing the difference between indoor and outdoor furniture and using them properly.