Should I Have Round or Square Tables in My Restaurant?

Round vs Square Tables

The shape of a table is just the shape of the table, right? Wrong! The differences in round and square table tops represent a change in the flow of your restaurant and how easy it is to rearrange and accommodate various party sizes.

Round tables are a flexible option because of how many people they can sit. It’s much easier for a hostess to squeeze in an extra person at a round top without defined edges and designated sides of the table. Restaurant owners should consider their fare before choosing a round table. Because of the “squeeze” factor, you don’t want to be cramming people in if your meals require multiple plates and more space. Round tables, especially larger sizes, can take up quite a bit of space, creating the perfect visual effect for a more cavernous restaurant.

Square tables have a huge benefit in their versatility in that they are easy to push together to accommodate a larger party. Suddenly, your 15 table tops can transform into nine square tops and two rectangle tops by pushing three tops together. Having this kind of flexibility can be very advantageous if the party size that comes into your restaurant varies from night to night, or even the time of day. Our most frequent recommendation to restaurant owners is to order two different size tops that have the same edge length (such as a 30” x 30” and a 30” x 48”) so it’s easy to line up sizes when combining table tops for bigger parties.

If you’re trying to compare table shapes with how many can occupy each size, here’s a handy table to help:

Table Size (Inches) Table Shape This Table Sits…
24” Round 2 people
24” Square 2 people
30” Round 3-4 people
30” Square 2-4 people
36” Round 3-4 people
36” Square 4 people
42” Round 4-5 people
42” Square 4-8 people
48” Round 4-5 people
60” Round 8 people
72” Round 10-12 people

Another important to factor to consider when choosing between round and square tables is accessibility and ADA compliance. To accommodate space for a wheelchair, tables and counters need to be between 28”-34” tall and have knee space of least 30” wide, 27” high, and 19” deep. You should keep this in mind with your table top and base selection; some disc bases that have a solid, wider footprint can prevent a wheelchair from going in.

At least five percent (or one if your count is under 20) of your tables need to be wheelchair-accessible for your customers.

Using both table shapes in your restaurant can shake up your layout, especially if you’re working with a small space. There are a couple ways you can do this to add visual interest without seeming too cluttered. Restaurants that offer a private party room can buy both shapes, utilize larger round tables in the party room since they are best fit for bigger groups, and use square tables in the dining area where you have more flexibility. You could also put bar height bases under a few round tables and create high tops, leaving the rest of the dining room as square tables.

Whatever table shape with you choose for your restaurant, be sure to keep at least 54” between round tables and 60” between square or rectangular tables to create a manageable service space to keep both guests and your servers happy.

Need help getting started? Visit our site or give our customer care specialists a call at 800-986-5352 to choose table tops and more for your restaurant.

New Product Alert!- Quarter Sawn Table Tops Have Arrived

We are pleased to announce that we are adding Quarter Sawn White Oak table tops to our solid wood collection!

What makes these table tops so different from the wood tops that we currently offer? Well, it is the unique way the wood is cut called quarter sawing.Quarter sawing is a type of cut that can be done to logs when they are sawn into lumber. This style of sawing gets its name because the log is first quartered lengthwise, resulting in wedges with a right angle ending at the center of the log. Each quarter is then cut separately by sawing boards along the axis. The results of this unique cutting process is the boards take on a straight striped grain line. In addition to a different style of grain, the cut creates greater stability than flatsawn wood.

Greater stability is one of the biggest benefits of this line of wood table tops the quarter sawing process gives the wood extra strength making it less likely to contract, expand, or warp. Wood is a natural material and contains some degree of moisture. Wood can warp when its moisture content changes. Exposure to differing temperatures, as well as the humidity of the surrounding air can lead to changes in the wood.

Our table tops have a 1 ½” edge and is available in a variety of sizes both square and round. They are built by our in-house Amish craftsmen and hand stained using one of our three different stain options, Michael’s Cherry, Bourbon, and Briar. These stains were specifically created to showcase the unique grain pattern that is part of this wood’s claim to fame. Once the stain is in place we use a coat of heavy catalyzed lacquer sealer and then a coat of a 10 sheen catalyzed lacquer top coat to make sure that your table is looking its best and holding up to the rigors of commercial use.

To make these beautiful table tops yours head on over to our Quarter Sawn Wood Table Tops page and start shopping!

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How Do I Clean My Restaurant Table Tops? FAQs from the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

Cleaning table tops

Restaurant furniture is built tough. The wear and tear that commercial furniture has to endure is far greater than the six chairs and table in your dining room. Because of this heavy usage, commercial furniture also comes with a responsibility. These pieces need to be maintained and properly taken care of to last to their full lifespan. We’ve put together this short guide to help restaurant owners learn a little more about cleaning their table tops.

Laminate table tops should be cleaned with warm water and soap (or detergent) mixture each day and dried with a soft cloth. Spills should be wiped up quickly to avoid further harm to the table. A combination of mild cleaner and baking soda can be used to remove stains from the surface with a stiff nylon brush.

Resin table tops should be cleaned daily with warm water and a mild detergent. Because of the texture of the table, resin tops should not be used with tableware that has unglazed bottoms. To remove scratches, use a toothpaste and car buffer or toothbrush to even out your table top.

Wood table tops can be maintained with mild soap and water. Whether it’s reclaimed, urban distressed, or butcher block tables, harsh cleaners and chemicals should not be used on these tops. These chemicals can harm your wood grain and create a gummy film on your table tops.

IsoTop and Werzalit table tops can be used indoors or outdoors and have a very similar cleaning procedure to other table tops. Soap and water can be used to wipe these tops down between uses. If being used on a patio, IsoTops can also be hosed down with other outdoor furniture.

Poly lumber table tops are very easy to maintain with soap and water. To remove leaf stains and other environmental elements, a wet Magic Eraser can work wonders to buff out the stain. These tops can even withstand a gentle pressure wash.

Stainless steel table tops should be cleaned with soap and water and then dried off as soon as possible. These tables should not be exposed to constant moisture, which can ruin the silicone seal around the edges. Taking proper care of these tops can provide multiple years of seasonal use.

Table top maintenance should be an everyday chore for you and your staff. By taking the time to upkeep your restaurant furniture, it can save you time and money in the future.

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