Should I Buy Metal or Wood Chairs for My Restaurant?

Selecting restaurant furniture requires a lot of considerations — cost, durability, type of restaurant, and more. How do you know which is the best option for you?

Here we’ve broken down some of the most important factors to consider when selecting chair material for your restaurant.

Is metal or wood more durable?

Wood restaurant chairs are durable — usually. Make sure that you’re buying a solid wood product, rather than particle board which won’t hold up to commercial use. 

You’ll want to look for tongue and groove construction. In this type of joinery, the chair components are interlocked with tight-fitting slots and ridges to hold it all together. It’s also a good idea to look for construction with added metal supports. This extra stability will help prevent the loosening of legs and backs over time.

But although well-made wood chairs can certainly hold up, metal restaurant chairs are still the winners when it comes to durability. You’ll want to look for a heavy-gauge steel construction with fully welded joints. A metal restaurant chair of 16 gauge steel or lower will last as long as your restaurant does.

Is metal or wood more comfortable? 

Both metal and wood are hard materials, so neither will feel like lying on a feather bed. Still, there are some comfort issues to consider. 

Both metal and wood chairs are available with upholstered seats, which can add some cushion. There are also options in both materials with curved backs, which can be easier on the spine.

Is metal or wood more versatile?

There are so many different styles of both metal and wood restaurant chairs that it’s hard to say! 

Both materials can be carved or formed into just about any shape you can think of. Styles like window pane, ladder back, and cross back can all be made in both metal and wood. Either option can be made in both modern and classic styles.

If you’re looking for bright colors, metal is the winner. Metal can be powder coated in a wide variety of colors to match your decor. But wood also comes in plenty of finishes like mahogany, walnut, oak, cherry, and beech.

To look through some of the many options, check out our metal restaurant chairs and wood restaurant chairs!

Does metal or wood require more maintenance?

Wood furniture will require cleaning and occasional polishing to keep it looking its best. And if you have painted wood furniture, it will need to be repainted from time to time, as chips are inevitable.

Conversely, metal furniture is practically maintenance-free, except for keeping it clean. 

Are metal or wood chairs more expensive?

In general, wood furniture is more expensive than metal. But you can find options in either material to fit most price points. 

Wood often has a higher-end look, so it can appear very expensive even if you get a good price!

So which one is the winner?

Both options are durable, come in a variety of styles and finishes, and require at least regular cleaning. So which is better?

While metal provides higher durability and lower maintenance, it all comes down to what makes the most sense for your space. 

Wood is a timeless material that will look beautiful in a warm, classic space. Pubs, steakhouses, quiet coffee shops, and rustic BBQ joints are all prime locations for wood chairs. “Old world” restaurants, like French and Italian, would also be a great fit.

Modern spaces like cafes, bars, and New American restaurants could be great places for metal furniture. It can bring an updated or industrial atmosphere to your restaurant. Metal furniture often has a more casual feel, but a high-end modern space could look stunning with a brightly powder-coated metal chair.

In the end, it all depends on the needs of your space! 


The Windsor Style Throughout History

There are no styles of furniture more associated with Colonial America than the Windsor style —  specifically, Windsor chairs. 

Airy yet sturdy, Windsor furniture is characterized by its delicately turned spindle backs and sculpted wooden seats. These pieces have straight legs that splay out at an angle, usually connected by an H-shaped stretcher for stability. And the back of Windsor chairs usually reclines.

Of course, like most things that America popularized during the 1700s, the Windsor chair has its origins somewhere else. 

The Windsor’s Origins

The chair’s roots trace back to the English town of Windsor, as long ago as the early 18th century. According to legend, King George II was out fox hunting when he was surprised by a downpour. He took refuge in a nearby cottage, where he found a crude chair with a spindle back. The king liked it so much that he had his royal furniture makers create his own for Windsor Castle. And thus, the trend was born. The truth of this story is debated, but it’s a good one nonetheless.

By the 1730s, Windsor chairs had come to Philadelphia, where they quickly spread to the rest of the colonies. Windsor furniture exploded into a booming industry. But as usual, American craftsmen weren’t content to simply adopt the English way of doing things. Instead, they made the chair their own.

To start, American builders removed the central “splat” that was common in the English version. This splat was a flat decorative piece of wood arranged in the center of the chair back, with spindles on either side. 

The Americans preferred a simpler look, with spindles making up the entirety of the chair back. They also made the legs narrower, and introduced the continuous arm, which was made of one solid piece of bent wood that curved along the back of the chair. 

Nails were generally unneccessary for the construction of Windsor furniture. Rather, the unseasoned wood components were all fitted together, and as they dried, the holes shrunk to create a tight fit. 

Types of Windsor Chairs

The American Windsor evolved into several basic styles, with hundreds of variations.

Bow Back

The bow back is framed by a single piece of curved wood that connects directly to the seat. Spindles of different heights follow the seat perimeter and connect to the bow at the top.

Low Back

The low back chair ends at about mid-back height, instead of extending up to head height.

Comb Back

The spindles on a comb back Windsor chair are all the same height. They connect about half-way up the spindle to a “center rail”, and at the top to a broad “handle”. This termination point gives the back the look of a hair comb

Hoop Back

The hoop back Windsor has a center rail that divides the spindles horizontally. This center rail curves past the spindles to form arms. 

Fan Back

Like the comb back, the fan back chair has spindles of a uniform height that meet a handle piece at the top. But the fan back has no center rail. Instead, there are two heavier turned stiles on the outside of the spindles to create stability. 

Writing Arm

The writing arm Windsor has a small desk piece attached to the right arm of the chair. This convenient addition made a comfortable place to write letters without requiring a large desk. Some writing arm chairs also had a small drawer beneath the desk where people could keep paper, pen, and ink stand. 

American Windsor furniture was usually made of several cheaper types of wood instead of one expensive hardwood. So they were painted to hide this mismatch. Common colors were red, yellow, blue, and especially green and black. They were sometimes decorated more extensively, with flowers, vines, and pastoral scenes. 

Windsor Chairs in History

The hoop back Windor chair in particular is practically synonymous with the American Revolution. This style shows up in paintings of the Second Continental Congress, as they were the chairs used in the Philadelphia State House in 1770s. They were made by Philadelphia furniture maker Francis Trumble, one of the era’s most prolific chair makers.

And they were popular at home too. Records show that Windsor chairs were owned by the likes of Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and George Washington. 

But they weren’t limited to indoor use. Some of the early American uses of Windsor chairs were in gardens and patios. 

In fact, the Washingtons were such fans that George Washington had 27 of them on the portico at Mount Vernon. And Martha Washington even had a Windsor high chair for her grandchildren, whom she raised

Thomas Jefferson also wrote the Declaration of Independence while sitting in a Windsor chair. He had a special revolving version that let him spin in his seat — the first example of a swivel chair!

The style was popular beyond just chairs. Settees for two or three people, rockers, high-backed or low-backed bar stools, and small side tables were all made in the Windsor style. Small tables would have three legs instead of three, and would be just large enough for a candle or cup of tea.

Part of what made these pieces so popular was the interchangeability of their components. Starting in the 1800s, manufacturers made spindles, legs, and seats, and shipped them to furniture makers for assembly. This partial mass-production made them affordable. 

Farmers and tradespeople could also make their own Windsor chairs, using turned spindles and legs that they could buy pre-made, and fashioning their own seats at home.

They were also a popular export particularly to Canada, Nova Scotia, and England.

The Golden Age of Windsor chairs lasted until about 1860, when they fell out of fashion during the Civil War and Restoration period. But the Colonial Revival of the 1910s brought them back into vogue. Another resurgence occurred in the 1980s, and they’re still popular today. 

Windsor Furniture Today

The general design of Windsor furniture makes them a comfortable classic. Collectors pine after Colonial Windsors in original condition. Unfortunately, many were stripped of their paint in the mid-1900s, when bare pine was in vogue. And many more were painted over, as their original finishes chipped and cracked. But a chair with its original paint could be worth $5,000 to $12,000 today! 

There are new versions as well, built both on a mass scale and hand-made by artisans. The art of the hand-made Windsor is still alive, with prices for a new custom piece ranging from $500 to thousands of dollars.

Windsor bar stools in particular are having a moment, with the current popularity of the large kitchen island. They provide a comfortable backrest, while their delicate spindles don’t hinder sightlines between kitchen and living space. 

And there are variations on the style, too. There are metal versions, brightly colored options, and sleek mid-century-inspired styles on the market as well. Check out our steel Windsor chairs and bar stools in powder-coated black or weathered iron!

Conclusion

The Windsor style has been a mainstay of American furniture since before there was an America. It’s hard to think of any other style of furniture that has been popular for so long. After enduring for nearly 300 years, it could easily be around for 300 more!

What is Tavern-Style Furniture?

Although the tavern was once a mainstay of American social life, it gave way over time to the cocktail bar, the restaurant, and for a while, the speakeasy.

But there are still some watering holes throughout the country that stick to the traditional tavern style. Some have been in business since the 1780s like Massachusetts’ Warren Tavern, while some are brand new! 

If you want to bring the tavern vibe to your town, here’s what you need to know.

A little history

Although the terms are used somewhat loosely these days, a tavern is not the same as a bar. A bar traditionally sells alcohol only, but a tavern sells both alcohol and food. 

Of course, we may think that sounds a lot like a restaurant. But the classic tavern was more of a waystation — a place for weary travelers to get some rest. In fact, they often had rooms to let as well. The food was not generally the reason that people went to taverns.

Taverns were often the social hub of rural America in the 1700s and 1800s. It was where neighbors met to share news, conduct business, and unwind after a day on the farm or in the office. So the American “tavern-style” has become connected with the furniture of the time. 

Although electricity and central heating are now commonplace, the modern tavern still emulates the taverns of the Colonial days. Lots of dark wood, low lighting, and heavy furniture make for a cozy gathering place!

Tavern-style tables

Since taverns were the local meeting place, tables were generally long and rectangular, with room for groups to congregate and dine together. 

American settlers and farmers had little time for delicate wood carving. So the furniture in the local tavern was generally simple, sturdy, and practical. And it was made with the most abundant resource of the time — wood.

For the modern tavern, rough sawn or distressed wood can create the appearance of age, or reclaimed barn wood can be used for an authentic patina. Pine and oak are common wood species for tavern-style furniture, although you could use a wide variety of hardwoods. 

Tavern-style tables have a simple rectangular plank top, usually sitting on four individual legs. Legs may be connected by two braces, which are then attached to a “stretcher” that runs the length of the table. 

While the more high-end taverns may have had turned table legs, the rural taverns would often be more rustic. Square post legs, like those on this hardwood table, would have been more common out on the frontier. 

Tables may also sit on an X-shaped base connected by a stretcher where the “x” crosses. This provides extra stability for those raucous tavern nights! 

Tavern-style seating

To add to the cozy feel of the tavern, look no further than the wood booth. Sliding into a booth, customers can settle in for a long evening of cold beer, hearty food, and good stories. 

The tavern booth, like the table, is usually made of simple wood planks. The seat may rest on four legs, like our single tavern wood booth. Or, it could have a rectangular box as the base, like our urban distressed wood booth.

Booths can be made of rich hardwoods, polished to a high shine. Or for a rustic tavern, they can be made of distressed or reclaimed wood. 

One common feature of just about all tavern-style booths is their high back. This creates an enclosure where guests can have some privacy while they’re enjoying their meal or drink. After all, important events can occur in taverns. The Boston Tea Party was planned at the Green Dragon Tavern in 1773!

The tavern bar

In most taverns, if the proprietor was going to splurge somewhere, it would be on the bar itself. Tavern back bars can be works of art, made of gleaming hardwood and carved with intricate designs.  Shelves need to be robust in order to hold heavy liquor bottles. And some are backed by mirrors, to make small spaces feel bigger.

Of course, not all tavern bars are so complex. A sturdy wood shelving unit, loaded up with whisky and spirits is all a tavern really needs.

To sit at that bar, you’d have to pull up a stool. Tavern-style bar stools would traditionally be backless — a simple square seat atop four legs. For a little more comfort, you could get a stool with a cushioned and upholstered seat, like this version from Regal Seating.

The tavern is all about the community. It’s a place for people to gather, whether they live down the road, or are just passing through. So keep it snug and intimate. You never know when someone will need to plan their next rebellion against those redcoats.

What is the Cost of Shipping for Restaurant Furniture?

FAQ's From the Files of East Coast Chair & Barstool

We live in a world where we’ve become accustomed to free or cheap shipping: free two-day shipping on that new laptop that you bought from Amazon Prime, or a flat $5.99 shipping on that silver charm bracelet that you got your wife for mother’s day. Those items ship via small package carriers like the US Postal Service, UPS Ground, or FedEx. They’re limited in size, weighing only a couple of pounds on average, and arrive at your front door in days.

Not all goods are as easy, or as cheap, to ship, however. Take restaurant furniture, for example. It’s big, bulky, heavy, and often ordered in multiple pieces (think 40 chairs, 10 bar stools, and 10 tables). For that reason, furniture is put on pallets and ships via a different method called less-than-truckload (LTL) carrier. LTL carriers take large palletized freight, and deliver it to your business on large semi-trucks.

There are many factors that determine the cost of shipping restaurant furniture via LTL carrier, some are obvious, and others, while not immediately apparent, make sense when you think about them. Here is a short list of the most important variables in the shipping calculation, along with a brief explanation.

Distance Between Shipper & Customer

The distance between the shipper and the customer (receiver) is one of the more obvious factors in the cost of shipping; we naturally expect that shipping from Boston to California will be more expensive than, say, shipping from Pennsylvania to Ohio. More distance means higher fuel costs and more driver time (wages). In addition, long trips often require a team of drivers that can alternate driving time in order to get the shipment to its destination in a timely manner.

Location

Shippers have what are called “good lanes” and “bad lanes”. A good lane is one that sees a lot of daily freight traffic, so the carrier knows that if they send a truck to that location, the odds are good that they will be able to fill the truck on the return trip. A bad lane is one in which there isn’t a lot of freight coming out, which means that the carrier may have to return empty, or only partially full. If a carrier can’t fill the truck, then they are making less money, or even losing money, on that trip. If a lane is bad for a carrier, then they will often charge more per piece to compensate themselves for the fact that they may not be able to fill the truck on the return. One prime example of a “bad lane” is Florida. There is a lot of freight going in to Florida, but not much coming out (for various reasons), so carriers will often charge a premium to deliver there.

Destination Type (Residential, Commercial, or Limited Access)

Customers often ask why it costs more to send a shipment to their home than it does to send the same shipment to their business. There are actually many reasons, but we’ll just list a few. First, businesses tend to be located in areas where large trucks can easily get in and out (if not, then they’re called limited access locations and are subject to the same fees as residential locations). Residential streets, on the other hand, are often too narrow for large semis to maneuver, so carriers have to send in a smaller truck, which means more handling of your freight. Second, businesses generally have somebody (or multiple people) and equipment on hand during business hours to unload the truck quickly and efficiently. Carriers know that they can just show up, open their doors, and the employees of the business will take care of the rest. With residential delivery, carriers have to call ahead to coordinate delivery, work around the homeowner’s schedule, and wait there until they unload the truck – often by hand.

Size of the Shipment

To simplify this point, let’s say you’re an LTL carrier that delivers from New York City to Orlando, FL. You know that to cover your costs and make a profit, you need to charge $3000 per truck for the trip. Now, a customer comes along and wants to ship 100 barstools to Orlando, which will take up about ⅓ of the truck. How much do you need to charge them? Of course, $1000! Now this is an over-simplification of the complex algorithms that carriers use to determine freight rates, but it does illustrate the point that the more of the truck you take up with your shipment, the more you pay.

Weight of the Shipment

You might be tempted to think that weight is the biggest factor in determining your freight costs, but that would be wrong. Weight does play a role, but it’s a smaller role than other variables. For example, according to one freight carrier website, you can ship a 48” x 48” x 60” pallet that weighs 200 pounds from Mercer, PA to Beverly Hills, CA (thank you Beverly Hills 90210 for being perpetually stuck in my brain and giving me a test zip code for life) for around $300. If we double the weight to 400 pounds, the rate only goes up around $50. Triple the weight, and you only increase another $20. How is this possible? Freight shippers use something called freight class, which is based on the density of your shipment: large, light materials have a high freight class, while smaller, denser materials have a lower freight class. As we raise the weight of the shipment, our density calculations go up, and our freight class goes down, which means that our overall rate only goes up a little bit for each additional pound that we ship.

Additional Services (Accessorials)

Accessorials are small additional services carriers provide that add up in a big way. Need a phone call before delivery? That’ll be up to $25, please. Want a lift gate to lower your pallets to the ground? They can range between $50 up to $200 depending on the carrier. Want the driver to bring your freight into the building? Don’t even ask! The point is that accessorial charges can be expensive, and should be avoided when possible.

As you’ve probably noticed, LTL freight is different from small package shipping in many ways. It can sound expensive at first, but there are two important things to remember.

  1. If you put 20 chairs on a pallet and it costs $200 to ship them, then that is only $10 per chair. If you were to ship the same number of chairs individually via small package delivery, the cost would be much higher.
  2. Truly free shipping is pretty much non-existent. You are almost always paying the freight, even if it doesn’t seem like it. It might come in the form of higher prices or reduced service levels, but shipping is always part of the cost of ordering restaurant furniture.

We hope this guide shed some light on the often confusing world of LTL freight and the true cost of shipping restaurant furniture.

If you have any additional questions, our shipping department is always happy to help. Just give us a call 800-986-5352.


East Coast Chair & Barstool Visits the Windy City

We are well into trade show season here at East Coast Chair & Barstool and we are excited to be heading to Chicago next! Trade shows allow us the opportunity to make connections with customers and feature some of our newest products. So, we are packing our bags and heading to McCormick Place once again.

In case you haven’t heard, the National Restaurant Association Show has reached their centennial year! This event is one of the biggest trade shows in the restaurant and hospitality industry. It is a great way to explore and learn everything that is happening in the industry. Discover innovations in equipment and supplies, to food technology, and even the latest furniture trends. In our experience, it is best to leave yourself at least two days to delve into all the exhibits.

This year the show will be featuring a panel discussion on the future of dining, moderated by Dawn Sweeney, President & CEO of the National Restaurant Association. Attendees can expect to come away with insight into trends and potential industry-altering changes. As a session with Allison Page, Chief Product Officer and Con-Founder of SevenRooms, and Christopher Thomas-Moore on Vice President of Global eCommerce & Digital Marketing for Domino’s Pizza on the everything from robotics and automation of technologies to ease operations in back-of-house.

We are excited to be exhibiting our brand new outdoor deep seating option, The Monaco Collection of outdoor deep seating, several new restaurant booth designs, and modern designed Emory Chair.
If you are around the Chicago area, make sure to come out May 18th-21st for the NRA show and stop by booth #6045. We’d love to meet you and discuss what we can do for your restaurant.

Introducing the Leesburg Booth

Creating the right atmosphere for your restaurant or bar is no easy task. From combining ingredients together to make fantastic meals to painting the walls in your brand’s color, you take pride in curating the elements your guests will experience as soon as they set foot into your restaurant. And your furniture should be no different!

Create an atmosphere that your customers will never forget by seating them in the handcrafted Leesburg booth.

No matter if you are furnishing a brewery, taproom, or rustic eatery, the Leesburg booth is constructed to invoke feelings of beauty and strength. This booth’s metal frame is made from clear coated steel that showcases welding marks. The frame fits itself nicely into the industrial trend with its “bare bones” aesthetic.

Playing from its rustic charm, the Leesburg booth’s metal frame is finished with your choice of distressed wood for the seat and back of the booth. Choose from reclaimed wood (salvaged barn wood available in Natural, Antique Black, or Whitewash finishes), urban distressed wood (new wood distressed to look old available in Provincial, Dark Walnut, and Ebony finishes), and rustic pine wood (available in Distressed Bourbon finish) options to complete the right booth for your restaurant.

Each type of wood is distressed to create texture and a uniqueness that can’t be replicated from booth to booth.

The Leesburg can be made as single and double booth layouts, which have customizable lengths, so you can outfit your restaurant’s needs accordingly. Regardless of what length you order, the Leesburg booth is 48” in height to accommodate traditional restaurant seating arrangements.

Find out more about the Leesburg booth on its single and double listings. You can also check out our other custom restaurant booths and find the right style for your business.

Work Smarter, Not Harder: 7 Furniture Styles That Can Be Used Inside or Outside Your Restaurant

With patio season right around the corner, it’s handy to have furniture that can pull double duty when you need it to!

Busy night out in your outdoor bar area? Grab some seating from indoors! A larger party just came in to dine? No problem, grab a table and base and give them some more space. Furniture that can be properly used inside and out can be extremely helpful for restaurants that shift their layout to where guests prefer to dine.

Whether you prefer classic design or something a little more trendy, East Coast Chair & Barstool has the right furniture that works harder inside and outside your restaurant.

Distressed Viktor Collection

Distressed Orange, Distressed Sky Blue, Distressed Black, Distressed Kelly Red, Distressed White, and Distressed Kelly Blue Viktor Chairs

We’ve taken one of our most popular rustic industrial styles and added the right pop of color! With six different colors, you can keep your color theme neutral (Black, White), whimsical (Sky Blue, Orange), or bold (Kelly Red, Kelly Blue) with the Distressed Viktor Collection.

So what makes this collection different from our other Viktors, besides the fun colors?

These Distressed Viktor bar stools and chairs go through a 10-step finishing process, ending with a strong powder coat. Through this process, the 16-gauge steel frame becomes durable enough to use inside or outside your restaurant.

These bar stools and chairs have the option to add a vinyl or wood seat, but these seat options are only warrantied for indoor use. To be able to use these Viktors wherever you need in your restaurant, leave the seat metal.

The weathered style is a great addition to your dining room space or patio, and right on trend! 

Hendrix Chairs

Distressed Black, Distressed Gray, and Distressed White Hendrix Chairs

Add a mid-century modern feel to your café tables or outdoor patio with the Hendrix chairs. These chairs boast a fully welded steel frame that’s been e-coated to make them durable for any commercial environment. The Hendrix chair has an overall squared silhouette with a ladder-style back that feeds into its classic appeal.

Enjoy design that you won’t find anywhere else, with unique colors that will set your space apart. Playing on the rustic trend, Hendrix chairs are available in classic colors (Distressed White, Distressed Gray, Distressed Black) with distressed markings. And if you have a slower night where you don’t need the chairs on in your dining room or patio, Hendrix chairs are stackable for easy storage.

Carlisle Chairs

Distressed Gray, Distressed Black, and Distressed Oak Carlisle Chairs

The Carlisle chair has a distinctive cross back design with stylized frame that never goes out of style. These chairs are fantastic for coffee shops, bakeries, and cafés that need to accommodate curbside tables as well as extra seating inside.

Strong and durable, the Carlisle chair’s 16-gauge steel frame is e-coated in three different colors (Distressed Black, Distressed Gray, Distressed Oak). This e-coating is what makes the Carlisle tough enough for indoor and outdoor use. To complete the look, the chair has artistic distress marks to give them a weathered, industrial look.

An ash wood seat is available for the Carlisle chairs but is only warrantied for indoor use.

The design of the frame allows these chairs to stack, making it easy to have them on hand and ready when you need to make space for extra customers.

IsoTop Sliq Table Tops

Black Steel, Cement, Dark Mica, Gray Oak, and Metal Line IsoTop Sliq Table Tops

Beautiful and durable, IsoTop table tops are a must for a restaurant that demands versatility in its dining layout. These table tops are a high-density laminate that have a modern European design and boast a sleek ½” edge profile.

Get the look of wood (Gray Oak), metal (Metal Line, Black Steel, Dark Mica), or marbled top (Cement) with a flat surface and added layers for increased durability. These tops are pre-stressed, UV-resistant, and have a dry matte finish that create a smooth surface.

IsoTop tables are great for tight spaces with their 32” x 32” square or 32” x 48” rectangle top size options.

Vienna, Palermo, and Newport Table Bases

Whether you’re looking for a table base with a little more flair (Vienna) or one that can hold an umbrella for your patio (Palermo, Newport), we have some bases that will support your table tops, inside and out!

Vienna Table Base

We’re shaking up the classic disc design with the Vienna base. This base is made of strong e-coated cast steel, making it ideal in your dining area or on your patio with its stylized ridge design. Depending on what table you’re supporting, the Vienna is offered with an 18”, 24”, or 30” plate and comes in table or bar height.

Indoor/ Outdoor Newport Table Base

The Newport table base is an instant-classic, especially for outdoor spaces, with its built-in umbrella holder. The Newport’s steel frame is powder coated black for a streamlined appearance and unbeatable durability. Choose from an 18” or 22” base size in table or bar height for your table tops.

Palermo Single Table Base in Black and Palermo Bar Height Double Table Base in Silver

Get the support you need with the Palermo single or double table base. If you think you’re going to need a place to support an umbrella, go with the single Palermo with its built-in umbrella holder. Need more support? Try the double Palermo base. Both the single and double styles are available in table and bar height. Regardless of which you choose, the Palermo is made from heavy duty steel that won’t corrode. Get the right base to match your décor (inside or out) by choosing a black or silver Palermo table base.

Each of these bases are available in have self-leveling floor glides for extra stability.  

Put your mind at ease by finding commercial-grade restaurant furniture that can be used inside and out. This will help keep your warranty intact and your restaurant layout flexible. 

Have a question about a product we discussed? Please call our customer care team at 800-986-5352 for more information. Be sure to also check out our catalog for all the latest products coming to East Coast Chair & Barstool.

Can I Use a Solid Wood Table Top as a Bar/Counter Top?

FAQ from East Coast Chair and Barstool

There’s no doubt that our wood tabletops are eye-catching. So much so, in fact, that many customers want to know if they can use them to top their bars or counter tops. Unfortunately, the answer is no, and there’s a good reason.

At East Coast Chair & Barstool, we offer a plethora of solid wood table tops that are manufactured with a specific sealing process designed for commercial dining tables, not bar tops.  Bar tops are traditionally finished with a thick layer of epoxy to create an impenetrable barrier between liquids and the surface of the wood. While this works well for bars, it tends to take away from the character and overall look of the wood, which is why it is not used for tables.

Even with our premium grade finishes, our solid wood tables are not warrantied for the wear and tear like an official bar top.

If you have further questions about our solid wood table tops, please give our customer care specialists a call at 800-986-5352.

Introducing the Monaco Deep Seating Collection

Create the outdoor oasis your restaurant patio has always needed. Allow customers to enjoy cocktails with co-workers and food with friends in your beautiful outdoor area while sitting in the lap of luxury in the Monaco Collection. The Monaco Collection is our brand-new deep seating line that consists of a chair, love seat, sofa, ottoman, coffee table, and side table.

See all the entire Monaco Collection by clicking through this slideshow:

  • Monaco Collection Love Seat in Driftwood Gray Poly Lumber and Canvas Navy Cushions

Each seating option comes with your choice of seat and back cushion. The ottoman also comes with a cushion so you can match! Choose from our selection of 10 stock Sunbrella cushion fabrics. These cushions are made from solution-dyed acrylic that is fade resistant and durable, perfect for commercial environments. Custom cushions are also available for purchase to your deep seating set.

Monaco Collection Sunbrella Stock Cushion Colors

The Monaco Collection features aluminum bracing on its poly lumber frame for extra strength. Because this collection has poly lumber construction, it’s easier to maintain and your staff will thank you! This deep seating collection can be made in over 20 poly lumber colors, including five wood grain options. This collection also arrives fully assembled so all you have to do is put it on your patio and start serving your customers!

Mix and match Monaco Collection pieces to find the right combination for your patio. If you need to create privacy, try pairing a few chairs and side table. Or if you’re looking to create a more group-centric setting, play around with the love seat, sofa, and coffee table. Create the layout on your patio to best serve your customers, staff, and restaurant flow.

Get seating that encourages guests to lean back and take it all in (with a drink in hand of course).

Ready to take your patio to new heights? Get started creating your Monaco Collection setup today. Have a question about our poly lumber or our deep seating? Give us a call at 800-986-5352 to speak with our customer care team.

March Tradeshows 2019, We’ll See You There!

The start of a new year means it’s the start of tradeshow season at East Coast Chair & Barstool. It’s always exciting to get out in the field and meet old customers and connect with new customers face to face. 

We will be exhibiting at the New England Food Show in Boston and at the Nightclub & Bar Show in Las Vegas this March. Tradeshows are a great way for your business to experience the latest technology, business practices, and network with vendors to find exciting new products. For us, tradeshows are a great time to showcase our newest furniture.

Both are can’t miss tradeshows for the restaurant industry but here’s a little more information about each show, so you can choose which is the best for you to attend.

New England Food Show (March 3-5, 2019)

New England Food Show - East Coast Chair & Barstool Tradeshows

Location: Boston Convention and Exhibition Center (Boston, Massachusetts)

We are headed back to Boston for our second time exhibiting at the New England Food Show (NEFS). This show is a great fit for any restaurateur looking to find new ways to get customers in the door, food trends, and ways of interacting with customers that will inspire loyalty.

Keynote speakers for this year’s NEFS include Aman Narang (president and co-founder of Toast), Anne Burrell (chef and Food Network personality), and Jim Koch (founder and brewer of Samuel Adams).

In addition to the exhibitors (stop and say hi to us in booth #543!), the show floor has culinary demonstrations (Center Stage), tech talks (Tech Theater), innovations to improve business efficiency (Tech Pavilion), complimentary social media consultations (Social Media Hub), and beverage pairing (Beverage Alcohol Pavilion).

There are various educational seminars being offered in the show’s ‘Ed-Quarters’ including sessions like “Appealing to the (Digital) Senses: How Video Moves Us Along the Path to Purchase”, “Own the Experience, Own the Results! The 4 Pillars of Success to Drive Guest Frequency”, and “Consumers Want Transparency, Not Greenwashing: How to Give It to Them”.

Nightclub & Bar Show (March 25-27, 2019)

Nightclub & Bar Show - East Coast Chair & Barstool Tradeshows

Location: Las Vegas Convention Center (Las Vegas, Nevada)

Calling all bar and nightclub owners, the Nightclub & Bar Show (NCB) is right around the corner in Las Vegas. This will be our sixth time exhibiting at this tradeshow since 2013 and we’re excited to go back! There’s no better location for the NCB show to take place than in the epicenter of nightlife that is Las Vegas. Enjoy learning about mixology, bartending systems, and tricks of the trade.

Listen to heads of industry like Jon Taffer of Bar Rescue and Jim Meehan, James Beard Award winner and bartender, speak about promoting your bar or restaurant in revolutionary ways. You can divulge new information with sessions like “The Food Delivery Challenge – Making Profits with Third Party Fees”, “How to Herd Cats: 7 Secrets to Get the Restaurant or Bar You Want”, “Service in America Sucks”, and “The Magic of Building a Beverage Program”.

You can also attend hands-on workshops, demonstrations, and trainings to teach your staff the latest skills and techniques. But definitely don’t miss East Coast Chair & Barstool in both #610!

At both of these shows, you’ll get to check out the additions to our product line up, like new rustic booths, distressed pine table tops, and even seating styles that can be used indoor or outdoor at your restaurant. No matter which coast you are on, come out and meet us at NEFS or NCB!