Banquet Seating & Decor: How to Set Up for Holiday Parties

The Thanksgiving and holiday seasons are popular for parties, large family style get-togethers, and end-of-year banquets.  If your restaurant, social hall, or club is taking reservations for private parties, you might be wondering how best to optimize your space and makeover your banquet room to create a festive but efficient party atmosphere this holiday season.   You’ll also need to make menu, staffing, and decoration decisions.  So let’s get started!

REDEFINE YOUR ROOM’S LAYOUT

Depending on your room dimensions and size of tables, you will have to adjust your space planning to accordingly fit your establishment.  Regardless, there are many ways to transform ordinary folding tables into welcoming places to gather, or rearrange your existing restaurant tables to create a new, more social space, that if done well can be breath taking.  Or, you may prefer to keep your restaurant seating the way it is, especially for less social gatherings or your corporate clients.  Take a look at some of our table layout suggestions, and see which room design will work for the specific parties you’re hosting this season.

The Classic Banquet Set-Up

Using rectangle tables, you can form long rows by butting the tables against each other.  With 8′ tables, you typically can fit 4 seats on each side.  At the joint where the tables adjoin, you may be able to add another seat (shown in red) if you’re short on space or need to fit more bodies in the room.  This should only be done if the extra seating capacity is needed and after you consider each person’s placement.  For example, if every person is going to have a soup bowl, entree dish, water glass, cocktail glass, silverware, name card, and favor, it might be a tight squeeze to add that extra person at the joint.  But if the setting is less formal and offers more room, they should be comfortable with that extra seat added.

Take note that 6-foot tables typically only seat 3 per side, or you can add the extra person where the tables adjoin.

If you need a head table, buffet table, or speaker’s podium, add it at perpendicularly to the other tables for easy viewing.

Setting Up with Banquet Rounds

Round tables offer a more formal look to your banquet space.  Tables that are 5-foot in diameter can seat 8 people, and they are the most commonly used size.  However, you could mix it up and use 4-foot tables, which seat 4 people, or 6-foot tables, which seat 10.

We recommend staggering the rows to maximize the space, verse setting up linear rows of rounds.  It creates a more visually appealing room, as well.

Creating One Large Round Banquet Table

To fit more people at a round table, consider adding four serpentine tables to the outside.  If you use a 60″ table in the middle, you can add four serpentines, each with a 5-foot inner radius, to create a table for at least 16 people.  Don’t need that many seats?  A 48″ round folding table paired with four 8-foot serpentines (4-foot inner radius) creates seating for 14.  As a bonus, the extra distance across the larger table offers an opportunity for a more significant centerpiece.

This set-up might be preferable for a large family enjoying Thanksgiving dinner together.

Creating One Large Rectangular Table

Likewise, you can create a larger rectangular table, too, with just a little ingenuity!  Four 8-foot tables combine to make seating for 20-22 people (depending on if you add a seat where the tables join along the sides).  This arrangement of tables may also be conducive for a large family meal, a conference or meeting, or to maximize space for seating up to 22.

Different U-Shape Configurations


Whether you do seating on both the interior and exterior, or keep guests on the outside only, U-shape configurations can be popular choice for different types of meetings or parties.  You can use serpentine tables to create rounded edges, or you can experiment with different lengths of rectangular tables.

Banquets Can Be Square Sometimes

Here, you can keep everyone along the perimeter.  The inside of the square is empty or hollow, so it’s not always the best way to optimize your space if you need room for a buffet, dance floor, or other party must-haves.  Again, you can round the corners with serpentine shaped tables if preferred.

Using Cocktail Tables for Non-Dinners

If you’re hosting a party that is not a formal sit-down dinner, you may want to offer seating for only half of the guests and provide tall cocktail tables for guests to stand and mingle around while enjoying light hors d’oeurves and their drinks.  This works well for networking events, as well as open house style parties, where not everyone is in the room at the same time.  Using cocktail tables creates a more social environment and allows guests to flow throughout the room or event without being tied to one seat.

Decide how your banquet room can be set up and how many people it can hold.  Offer as many options for your customers, and be willing to rearrange your tables based on their unique needs or type of meeting.  As you’re planning the space, be sure to take into consideration any other furniture you’ll need to set up, such as a buffet, dance floor, podium, A/V equipment, or gift table.

PLANNING THE PARTY MENU

A party of 30? 50? 200? No problem.  There are many options when it comes to your private party menus.  Here are just a few worth considering:

  1. Stick to your regular menu, and staff your restaurant with enough staff to take 30 unique meal orders and push them out of the kitchen simultaneously.
  2. Offer party guests a special, limited menu with only a few meal choices to select from.
  3. Plan the complete menu choices in advance with the person organizing the meal.  They can select three dinner choices from the menu and offer their guests they opportunity to pre-order from those selections.  With a little mark on each person’s name card, serving the right dishes to the right people becomes a cinch.
  4. Prepare the same meal for each guest, as determined by the person organizing the party.
  5. Consider family style dinners, where guests share larger portions amongst each other.
  6. Set up a buffet instead of serving the meal. Or, you can use a buffet to house the appetizers instead of butlering them before you serve dinner, or you can use a dessert buffet after you serve the dinner, so your staff aren’t serving every course.

Worried you’re not sure how much food to serve?  Be sure to check out our helpful resources pin board to find the answers!  We’ll show you how much cake you’ll need, how to stock your bar, and even how to set the table.

Talk about bar options before the party with the event organizer.  Is it an open bar? A cash bar?  Is it fully stocked?  Is it beer and wine only?  Alcohol is one of the most expensive items on your menu, so make sure both you and the organizer are in agreement over what type of bar you’re having the night of the party.

Depending on the number of guests, the type of menu and meal options you decide on, and whether your restaurant is open for normal business during the time of the party, you’ll have to consider the amount of staff you need to have on hand.

DECORATE & ENTERTAIN

It’s time for the finishing touches!  Be astonishing and add those details that really make your guests “ooh” and “ahh” when they walk in that front door!  Whether it’s a traditional cornucopia or a contemporary dash of glitter and glam, you want the party-goers to feel special. Take the extra steps to add some decorations, centerpieces, or holiday charm to the room. You’ll also want to consider if you’re using linens on the tables, chair covers, or if you need to secure stack chairs, folding chairs or Chiavari chairs for the special event. Maybe you need to find a holiday station on the music platform you subscribe to for entertainment, or book a live band for your guests’ enjoyment. And don’t forget to train your staff to be courteous and cheerful, so the party is a hit for everyone in attendance!

It’s the extra steps you’ll take that will set you apart from your competition and get a repeat booking for next year’s celebration!

On behalf of everyone at East Coast Chair & Barstool, we wish you a very happy, joyful, and peaceful Thanksgiving. May you have many blessings to count and a successful holiday season!

Restaurant & Banquet Space Planning: Tables & Chairs Seating Capacity

What size tables do I need?  How many people can fit comfortably at each table?  How many tables can I fit in my space?  How much room do I need to leave between tables?

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These are all questions that run through your mind as you design the layout of your restaurant or banquet center. Choosing the correct elements is crucial for efficient operations and creating the ideal atmosphere for your guests. Here is a checklist of considerations you will need to address during planning.

Space Planning:

Figuring out your goals of the space will save a lot of headaches in the end.  You want to take stock of your main priorities with your space before taking any action. Determine what you as a business require from the space and run with it.

  • Determine the square footage of your area. Physically, you must know how much room you have to work with in order to organize it.
  • Make a list of all the functions you plan on using the space for (e.g., restaurant dining, banquet style seating, classroom/seminar seating, with or without dance floor, bar and cocktail areas, buffet or stage areas).
  • Know what your brand is and how you want to portray that. The atmosphere that you are trying to convey to your public can be used as the inspiration for creating the layout.
  • Understand customer expectations. There’s a fine line between what customers want from you and what you are able to do for them; find that line.

Restaurant Furniture Pro Tip

Brainstorm, brainstorm, and brainstorm! This is not something to just jump into; it requires time and effective planning to lay the creative foundation for your dream space. Now is the perfect stage to mentally move your ideas around without having to do any heavy lifting.

“When you’re working with a sales member, it’s important to know what your vision is so we can better serve you, the business owner. If you’re at a loss for inspiration, I recommend studying other people’s layouts in restaurants or bars. What works, what doesn’t work can jumpstart your own ideas.”

– Chris Miller, Customer Care Specialist

 

It's important to measure your space before planning for your restaurant furniture.Go the Distance:

It’s always helpful to have some requirements to keep mind while you’re getting the measurements you need for your space. Here are some industry-standards to help you when it comes to furniture placement.

  • Allow 18″ from the edge of the table to the back of each seat
  • Allow at least 12″ between chairs that are back-to-back
  • Allow a minimum of 24″ of aisle or service space (please note, the Americans with Disability Act requires greater room in at least 5% of the dining area for wheelchairs)
  • Allow 54″ between round tables and 60″ between rectangular tables to create the needed service space
  • Allow 24″ – 30″ between table corners when placed diagonally
  • Allow 12” between your seat and the bar or table

Pro Restaurant Furniture Tip

Map it out with the right materials. While taking the above measurements in mind, don’t forget to start with basics. Pull out the graph paper and set a scale to determine the approximate number of tables and chairs that will fit.

“Try drawing or modeling out your layout with chalk or boxes. This can give you a better idea of the space you’re working with, reducing mistakes when you order. It can help a sales team member be able to help you more efficiently.”

– Chris Miller, Customer Care Specialist

 

Choose Your Table Shape and Size:

The most important part of selecting a table shape and size is that the tables have adequate space and go with your vision for your particular establishment.

  • Square tables offer the most flexibility and are easiest to move around or rearrange. For a durable, streamlined option that’s easy to push together, check out our Isotop collection.
  • Round tables are often considered the most elegant and are great for banquet seating. Drop leaf round tables can offer some additional flexibility in case you need to accommodate a large party.
  • Rectangular tables are most common for the everyday dining experience because of their versatility. Our rustic  farm tables are a popular choice for large or small seating needs.

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Follow our recommended table seating capacity chart, and think about how and what you serve to your customers.  Are you just a coffee and dessert establishment, or are you a fine dining restaurant that offers 8-course meals?  Envision everything that will be taking up space on your table tops.  Will you have candles, salt and pepper shakers, water pitchers, wine cantors, etc?  Do you serve full-course breakfasts that come on three plates per person?  Or do you serve bar food that takes up less space?  Keep all these things in mind when you choose your table size and how many chairs you put around each one. While it is recommended that each person have 2 feet of the table’s circumference or perimeter, or an estimated 300 square inches of table top space, your patrons may require more space depending on what you are serving.  On the same token, elementary school cafeterias would not need to offer as much space per person as a college or corporate cafeteria. These concepts are subjective to your needs.

Many restaurants incorporate varying sizes of tables to allow for maximum seating capacity, the flexibility to serve differing sizes of parties at the same time, and to create a more aesthetically appealing restaurant space.

Pro Restaurant Furniture Tip

A variety of seating styles can change up any area. Mixing booth or “anchored” tables (edge of table against wall) with floating tables is a great way to maximize space. Placing square tables diagonally also saves floor space and can restrict views from one table to another to create a more private dining experience for your guests.

Measuring/mapping your space out is crucial to avoid a mistake whenever you order. You don’t want to buy too many or too little tables and chairs. By knowing your space and what you can fit in it, the sales team can help from there. In the end, you don’t want to have to worry about shipping materials back or a restocking fee. It’s cheaper and more efficient to choose your products correct the first time.”

– Chris Miller, Customer Care Specialist

 

Some Additional helpful tips:

 

  • Check the local codes and be sure you always comply with the Americans with Disability Act (ADA). As a rule, 5% of the total space should be accessible to people in wheelchairs. Wheelchairs typically require a 36″ clearance for aisle space in dining areas. Be sure the section of your establishment that is ADA-compliant is accessible to the entrance/exit and also public areas, such as the bathroom or cashier’s counter.
  • Do you foresee rearranging tables frequently for different events? Be sure to purchase lightweight tables and chairs that will be easy to haul around, and choose ones that will not mar your floors. You may also be interested in purchasing a chair and table dolly to lighten your staff’s load.
  • Want to be prepared for extra customers? Keep a few lightweight stacking chairs in storage in case you need to pull them out to accommodate larger parties.
  • Not expecting a lot of movement? If you are a finer dining establishment, you may want to choose the larger table per recommended number of guests and purchase heavier chairs that create an illusion of being more prestigious and luxurious.

While these guidelines and recommendations are helpful starting points, laying out a unique restaurant or banquet space for your particular establishment and utilizing the space you have for your specific goals will take a lot of thought. Don’t be afraid to think outside the box and design a great looking restaurant or banquet space that effectively meets you and your guests’ expectations!

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Check out our site for more tips and furniture to fill up your newly planned out space!

 

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Resource: Seating Chart

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